A World Both Foreign and Familiar

December 10, 1907 entry, Diary #6, 1905-1909, Box 1 Folder 6, The Munger Family Diaries, 1882-1945. Mss. Acc. 2014.018.“Like Dorry, I have decided to keep a journal. It seems to me a very pleasant thing to write down the occurrences of one’s life so that one can read them later.” So writes twenty-year-old Rosanna May Munger in 1886 (January 1 1886, Diary #1). Rose, as she preferred to be called, would go on recording the rhythms of her daily routine until 1945, providing the modern reader with a unique window into the religious, social, and cultural life of an unmarried woman over several decades.

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Powell Family Papers – Hepburn Addition Available Online

3 June 1778.  Dr. Griffith to Leven Powell at Valley Forge.Through the work of our student assistants, volunteers, and staff, Special Collections has recently reprocessed, digitized, and made the Powell Family Papers, Hepburn Addition available online. The bulk of the collection consists of the correspondence of Leven Powell, U.S. President James Madison, Charles Leven Powell, Charles Leven Powell, Jr., Selina Powell Hepburn, and others. Some of the subjects discussed in the letters include the American Revolution, slavery, the Presidential Election of 1800, the American Civil War, and early American politics. Scans of the collection are now available in the William & Mary Digital Archive.

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Collection Grants at Work: Prof. Xin Wu’s Chinese Painting Students Engage with Facsimile Art Objects

Student opens facsimile handscroll in Special Collections class sessionEach week during the semester, Special Collections hosts multiple class sessions to allow students hands-on access to primary source materials relevant to their course’s subject matter. This week, Professor Xin Wu brought her ARTH 397 students into Special Collections to view facsimile artwork as part of her Chinese Painting class, which is being offered for the first time this fall.

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Breaking in the Archives

Wild Style, 1983Devoted to the history of Virginia’s hip-hop culture, the William & Mary Hip-Hop Collection has documented shared cultural origins with the Bronx and greater New York City. As early as 1979, many of Virginia’s hip-hop pioneers were listening to the earliest commercial rap releases from New York City on Virginia radio stations, most prominently WRAP-AM broadcasting from Norfolk. By the mid-1980s, the release of Hollywood films such as Wild Style and Beat Street featuring hip-hop cultural elements propelled Virginia’s pioneers to begin forming dance crews, similar to the b-boys and b-girls that began dancing at parties throughout the Bronx in the early 1970s.

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Fostering Hope and Community in an Internment Camp

December 24, 1942 entry, Hilda Haworth Diary, Mss. Acc. 2011.726On Friday, the 25th of September, 1942, Hilda Haworth, her husband Walter, and many others left the English Channel island Guernsey for Germany. The diary details life in the camp for a little over a year, and was immensely fascinating to read through. While I knew that the Nazis had set up internment camps for various populations during the war, I had never encountered the story of the Guernsey, which is located off the coast of Normandy, France and was surprised to find that the Germans actually brought many Guernsey residents to camps in Germany.

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A Treasure Trove of the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Early National Periods

Portrait of St. George Tucker, (1752-1827)Currently, the Tucker-Coleman Papers are undergoing a serious overhaul. Groups of boxes are being subdivided into intuitive series within the collection, and the finding aids for each are going digital, making the Tucker Coleman Papers more accessible to researchers than ever.

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Diary of an Ocean Voyage to Latin America

Sketch of San Jose, Guatemala, 17 Aug. 1934. Marie Katherine and Oliver E. Seegelken Papers, 1918-1943 (Mss. Acc. 2014.083)In the period “between the wars,” Marie Seegelken and her husband Oliver embarked on a cruise from Los Angeles to Cristobal, Panama. The couple left Los Angeles on August 7, 1934 after dining the night before at the California Yacht Club. The passengers started their voyage on the SS Santa Catalina but were transferred to the SS Santa Elena for the voyage home where they arrived on September 4. Both ships were part of the W. R. Grace Company line.

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Left in the Lurch

Excerpt of Letter, Asher Marx, New York, New York to Moses Myers, Norfolk, Virginia, 1819 June 14In 1819 Asher Marx (no relation to Groucho) wrote a letter to Moses Myers of Norfolk, Virginia complaining about his money problems, saying that his credit would have been sufficient to support his family but Wilson & Cunningham “left me in the Lurch” for $40,000.  Did they really use that expression in the early 19th century?  Was Asher the one who coined the phrase?  Does the Special Collections Archive have an important piece of etymological history?

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